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13Oct/14Off

Ryan Adams – Discography (2000-2014) [FLAC]

Genre: Rock
Styles: Singer/Songwriter, Alternative, Country
Source: CD
Codec: FLAC
Bit rate: ~ 1,000 kbps
Bit depth: 16
Sample rate: 44.1 kHz

2000 Heartbreaker
2001 Gold
2002 Demolition
2003 Rock N Roll
2003 Love Is Hell, Part 1
2003 Love Is Hell, Part 2
2005 Cold Roses
2005 Jacksonville City Nights
2005 29
2007 Easy Tiger
2007 Everybody Knows EP
2007 Follow the Lights EP
2008 Cardinology
2010 III/IV
2010 Orion
2011 Ashes & Fire
2014 Ryan Adams

Mixing the heartfelt angst of a singer/songwriter with the cocky brashness of a garage rocker, Ryan Adams is at once one of the few artists to emerge from the alt-country scene to achieve mainstream commercial success and the one who most strongly refused to be defined by the genre, leaping from one spot to another stylistically while following his increasingly prolific muse. Adams was born in Jacksonville, North Carolina in 1974. While country music was a major part of his family’s musical diet when he was young (he’s cited Loretta Lynn, George Jones, Merle Haggard, and Johnny Cash as particular favorites), in his early teens Adams developed a taste for punk rock and began playing electric guitar.

At 15, Adams started writing songs, and a year later he formed a band called the Patty Duke Syndrome; Adams once described PDS as “an arty noise punk band,” with Hüsker Dü frequently cited as a key influence and reference point. The Patty Duke Syndrome developed a following in Jacksonville, and when Adams was 19 the band relocated to the larger town of Raleigh, North Carolina in hopes of expanding its following. However, Adams became eager to do something more melodic that would give him a platform for his country and pop influences. In 1994, Adams left the Patty Duke Syndrome and formed Whiskeytown with guitarist Phil Wandscher and violinist Caitlin Cary. With bassist Steve Grothman and drummer Eric “Skillet” Gilmore completing the lineup, Whiskeytown (the name came from regional slang for getting drunk) released their first album, Faithless Street, on the local Mood Food label.

The album won reams of critical praise in the music press, and more than one writer suggested that Whiskeytown could do for the alt-country or No Depression scene what Nirvana had done for grunge. But by the time Whiskeytown had signed to a major label — the Geffen-distributed imprint Outpost Records — the band had undergone the first in a series of major personal shakeups, and in the summer of 1997, when Whiskeytown’s Outpost debut, Stranger’s Almanac, was ready for release, Adams and Wandscher were the only official members of the group left. Cary soon returned, but Wandscher left shortly afterward, and Whiskeytown had a revolving-door lineup for much of the next two years, with the band’s live shows become increasingly erratic, as solid performances were often followed by noisy, audience-baiting disasters. Consequently, as strong as Stranger’s Almanac was, Whiskeytown never fulfilled the commercial expectations created for them by others. In 1999, the band — which was down to Adams, Cary, and a handful of session musicians — recorded its third and final album, Pneumonia, but when Geffen was absorbed in a merger between PolyGram and Universal, Outpost was phased out, and the album was shelved; shortly afterward, Whiskeytown quietly called it quits.

Following Whiskeytown’s collapse, Adams wasted no time launching a career apart from the band, and after a few solo acoustic tours, Adams went into a Nashville studio with songwriters Gillian Welch and David Rawlings and cut his first album under his own name, Heartbreaker, which was released by pioneering “insurgent country” label Bloodshot Records in 2000. The album received critical raves, respectable sales, and a high-profile endorsement from Elton John, and Adams was signed by Universal’s new Americana imprint, Lost Highway Records. Lost Highway gave Whiskeytown’s Pneumonia a belated release in early 2001, and later that same year the label released his second solo set, Gold, which displayed less of a country influence in favor of classic pop and rock styles of the 1970s. In the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks, the album’s opening track, “New York, New York,” was embraced by radio as an anthem of resilience (though it actually concerned a busted romance), and Adams once again found himself touted as “the next big thing.”

Always a prolific songwriter, in a bit more than a year following Gold’s release Adams had written and recorded enough material for four albums. He opted to whittle the 60 tunes down to a 13-song collection called Demolition, which was released in 2002 as he went into the studio to record his official follow-up to Gold. A year later, Adams’ concept album Rock N Roll was released alongside the double-EP collection Love Is Hell. Tours around the globe kept Adams busy into the next year as he maintained momentum writing songs and keeping his ever-changing presence in the music press. In May 2005, Adams released his first of three albums for Lost Highway, the melancholic double-disc Cold Roses. Jacksonville City Nights, a more classic-sounding honky tonk effort, followed in September, and 29 appeared in late December. Always prolific, in the interim period before his next album was released Adams posted a large selection of tracks — including several hip-hop tunes — on his website, but fans were greeted with more straightforward material on 2007′s Easy Tiger and 2008′s Cardinology with the Cardinals.

Adams decided to disband the Cardinals in 2009, precipitating an unusual period of quiet from the prolific singer/songwriter. He slowly returned to active duty in 2010, releasing the heavy metal Orion on vinyl only in the summer and then issuing III/IV — a double album recorded with the Cardinals during the Easy Tiger sessions — in November. For his 13th solo album, 2011′s Ashes and Fire, the singer/songwriter recruited Norah Jones and Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers’ keyboard player Benmont Tench, as well as legendary producer Glyn Johns, who had helmed the Who classic Who’s Next.

Following Ashes and Fire, Adams’ musical career was temporarily put on hold while he suffered with an inner-ear disorder, which resulted in a collection of canceled shows. However, after hypnotherapy treatment, Adams began writing music again, and he holed himself up in his L.A. Pax-Am studios with bassist Tal Wilkenfeld, drummer Jeremy Stacey, and guitarist/producer Mike Viola to work on new material. The resulting self-titled album was due for release in 2014.

13Oct/14Off

Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s – Discography (2006-2014) [FLAC]

Genre: Rock
Styles: Indie
Source: CD, WEB
Codec: FLAC
Bit rate: ~ 1,000 kbps
Bit depth: 16
Sample rate: 44.1 kHz

2006 The Dust of Retreat
2008 Animal
2008 Not Animal
2008 The Daytrotter Sessions
2010 Buzzard
2011 Happy Hour at Sprigg’s Volume 1
2012 Rot Gut, Domestic
2014 Slingshot to Heaven

The dreamy, bittersweet music of Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s is primarily the work of singer/songwriter Richard Edwards, who formed the indie rock collective in his native Indianapolis. Named after the Margot Tenenbaum character in Wes Anderson’s sophisticated comedy The Royal Tenenbaums, the band took root in 2004, when Edwards decided to flesh out his scenic chamber pop sound with help from guitarist Andy Fry, cellist Jesse Lee, pianist Emily Watkins, trumpeter Hubert Glover, drummer Chris Fry, percussionist Casey Tennis, and bassist Tyler Watkins.

The band’s debut album, The Dust of Retreat, was issued on the local indie label Standard Recording in 2005. The picturesque, dozen-song set earned the band a loyal following, and Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s signed with Artemis Records later that year. A remixed and remastered version of The Dust of Retreat was released in March 2006, but a series of label acquisitions (Artemis bought V2, Virgin Records effectively absorbed the band, and Capitol merged with Virgin) convinced the group to partner with another company instead. They relocated to the Epic roster in October 2007 while working on their sophomore release. After tracking approximately 25 songs, however, the band clashed with Epic over which songs to include in the final release. As a result, two versions of the album were released: Animal!, a vinyl and digital release of the band’s preferred version, and Not Animal, a traditional CD release featuring those songs favored by the label.

After touring in support of the Animal! albums, Edwards relocated to Chicago and began pruning the band’s lineup, eventually dissolving it altogether and rebuilding it from the ground up. Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s thus became a six-piece band featuring Brian Deck on drums, Ronnie Kwasman and Erik Kang on guitars, Cameron McGill on keyboards, and Tyler Watkins on bass. Watkins and Kang had both played in an earlier version of Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s, while the other three were Chicago-based musicians who joined the lineup in 2009. After building a makeshift recording studio in an abandoned movie theater, the six explored a lean, rock-influenced sound on Buzzard, which became the band’s third album after its release in September 2010. In 2012 the band returned with Rot Gut, Domestic, a stylistically adventurous album exploring more guitar-driven ’90s-styled rock and flirting with country & western influences. Fifth album Sling Shot to Heaven arrived in 2014, recorded entirely to analog tape in the band’s home studio and released on their own label.

13Oct/14Off

Mae – Discography (2003-2011) [FLAC]

Genre: Rock
Styles: Indie, Emo, Alternative
Source: CD
Codec: FLAC
Bit rate: ~ 1,000 kbps
Bit depth: 16
Sample rate: 44.1 kHz

2003 Destination: Beautiful
2004 Destination: B-Sides
2005 The Everglow
2007 Singularity
2009 (m)orning
2010 (a)fternoon
2011 (e)vening

Boasting a sound that straddled the border of alternative rock and emo-pop, Mae (an acronym for Multisensory Aesthetic Experience) was formed in early 2001 by guitarist Matt Beck, drummer Jacob Marshall, bassist Mark Padgett, keyboardist Rob Sweitzer, and vocalist Dave Elkins. The band initially started out as a project between Elkins and Marshall, students at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. Recording sessions were booked at Padgett’s home studio, and the duo quickly grew into a quintet as the co-founders rubbed shoulders with other local musicians. Nearly eight months later, Mae had cemented its sound and landed local shows with the likes of the Movielife, River City High, and the Exit. In the process, the group also recorded songs for a debut album, Destination: Beautiful, which was released in early 2003 by Tooth & Nail.

While touring to support Destination: Beautiful, guitarist Matt Beck stepped down from his post and was replaced by former Unsung Zeroes guitarist Zach Gehring. Destination: B-Sides surfaced near the end of 2004. Mae’s second proper studio album, The Everglow, followed in 2005, and the band’s dedicated audience (not to mention its coveted spot on the Warped Tour that summer) helped the album peak at number 51 on the Billboard 2000. Mae joined the Virgin College Mega Tour in early 2006, appearing alongside Over It and Yellowcard in the process, and a bonus edition of The Everglow appeared that April with additional tracks and a bonus DVD. The musicians’ contract with Tooth & Nail ran out later that year, and they went on to sign a deal with Capitol, thus making Mae a major-label act.

Singularity was released during the summer 2007 and cracked the Top 40, selling roughly 17,000 copies during its first week. It proved to be Mae’s only release for Capitol, however, as the band left the label’s roster in 2008 and forged ahead as an independent act. Early the following year, the (m)orning EP became Mae’s first independently released disc, although it received a widespread release in September courtesy of Cell Records. They followed up quickly in 2010 with another EP, (a)fternoon.

13Oct/14Off

In Flames – Discography (1994-2011) [FLAC]

Genre: Rock
Style: Melodic Death Metal
Source: CD, WEB, vinyl
Codec: FLAC
Bitrate: ~ 1,000 – 2,600 kbps
Bit Depth: 16, 24
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz, 96 kHz

CD Rips (16/44)

1994 Lunar Strain
1994 Subterranean
1996 The Jester Race
1997 Whoracle
2000 Clayman
2002 Reroute to Remain
2003 Trigger (EP) (Japan)
2004 Soundtrack to Your Escape
2006 Come Clarity
2008 A Sense of Purpose
2009 Colony (Reloaded)
2011 8 Songs (EP)
2011 Where the Dead Ships Dwell (Single)
2011 Sounds of a Playground Fading
Vinyl Rips (24/96)

1996 The Jester Race
2002 Reroute to Remain
2008 A Sense of Purpose

Artist Bio

After leaving Ceremonial Oath to form In Flames, founding member and guitarist Jesper Strömblad saw this project as a way of expressing his songwriting creativity rather than being stuck in the background. With the added influences of Iron Maiden and Black Sabbath, along with his own touch of aggressive metal that overwhelmed his home country of Sweden, Wrong Again Records took notice and released In Flames’ 1993 debut, Lunar Strain. In the tradition of many other Swedish metal acts, In Flames also had a revolving lineup that changed year after year — not that this was going to stop them from releasing their next album, Subterranean (1994), before signing to Nuclear Blast Records in 1996.

After putting out The Jester Race album later that year, followed by 1997′s Whoracle, In Flames’ lineup was finally settled with Björn Gelotte (drums), Anders Fridén (vocals), Peter Iwers (bass), and Daniel Svensson (drums) in addition to Strömblad. To celebrate, the band released its sixth album, Colony, in 1999. Clayman followed in the same vein the next year, and the band even managed to keep the same lineup for this release. The live Tokyo Showdown was released to promote their tour in 2001. Reroute to Remain arrived in 2002, followed by Soundtrack to Your Escape in 2004 and Come Clarity in 2006. In 2008 the band released its ninth studio album, A Sense of Purpose, which featured the single “Mirror’s Truth,” followed in 2011 by Sounds of a Playground Fading, which was the first release not to include founding guitarist Strömblad, who left the band the previous year.

27Sep/14Off

D’Angelo – Discography (1995-2008) [FLAC]

D’Angelo – Discography (1995-2008) [FLAC]
flac – lossless | 1.85 GB | R&B, Neo Soul

D’Angelo was one of the founding fathers and leading lights of the neo-soul movement of the mid- to late ’90s, which aimed to bring the organic flavor of classic R&B back to the hip-hop age. Modeling himself on the likes of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Prince, Curtis Mayfield, and Al Green, D’Angelo’s influences didn’t just come across in his vocal style — like most of those artists, he wrote his own material (and frequently produced it as well), helping to revive the concept of the R&B auteur. His debut album, Brown Sugar, gradually earned him an audience so devoted that the follow-up, Voodoo, debuted at number one despite a five-year wait in between.

Michael D’Angelo Archer was born February 11, 1974, in Richmond, VA, the son of a Pentecostal minister. He began teaching himself piano as a very young child, and at age 18, he won the amateur talent competition at Harlem’s Apollo Theater three weeks in a row. He was briefly a member of a hip-hop group called I.D.U. and signed a publishing deal with EMI in 1991. His first major success came in 1994 as a writer/producer, helming the single “U Will Know” on the Jason’s Lyric soundtrack; it featured a one-time, all-star R&B aggregate dubbed Black Men United. That helped lead to his debut solo album, 1995′s Brown Sugar. Helped by the title track and “Lady,” Brown Sugar slowly caught on with R&B fans looking for an alternative to the hip-hop soul dominating the urban contemporary landscape; along with artists like Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill, and Maxwell, D’Angelo became part of a retro-leaning, neo-soul revivalist movement. Brown Sugar received enormously complimentary reviews and sold over two million copies, and D’Angelo supported it with extensive touring over the next two years.

And then — not much of anything happened. D’Angelo took some time off to rest and split acrimoniously with his management; meanwhile, EMI went under, leaving his 1998 stopgap release Live at the Jazz Cafe out of print. On occasion, D’Angelo contributed a cover tune to a movie soundtrack, including Eddie Kendricks’ “Girl You Need a Change of Mind” (Get on the Bus), the Ohio Players’ “Heaven Must Be Like This” (Down in the Delta), and Prince’s “She’s Always in My Hair” (Scream 2). He also duetted with Lauryn Hill on “Nothing Really Matters,” a cut from her Grammy-winning blockbuster The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill. Still, fans awaiting a proper follow-up to Brown Sugar remained frustrated — at first by no news at all, and then by frequent delays in the recording process and the scheduled release date. Finally, the special-guest-laden Voodoo was released in early 2000 and debuted at number one, an indication of just how large — and devoted — D’Angelo’s fan base was. The extremely Prince-like lead single, “Untitled (How Does It Feel),” was a smash on the R&B charts and won a Grammy for Best Male R&B Vocal; likewise, Voodoo won for Best R&B Album. Reviews of Voodoo were once again highly positive, although a few critics objected to the looser, more atmospheric, more jam-oriented feel of the record, preferring the tighter songcraft of Brown Sugar.

Contents:

1. Brown Sugar [1995]
2. Live at the Jazz Cafe [1998]
3. Voodoo [2000]
4. The Best So Far… [2008]

23Sep/14Off

Big Star – Discography (1972-2009) [FLAC]

Big Star – Discography (1972-2009) [FLAC]
flac – lossless | 5.2 GB | Rock

The quintessential American power pop band, Big Star remains one of the most mythic and influential cult acts in all of rock & roll. Originally led by the singing and songwriting duo of Alex Chilton and Chris Bell, the Memphis-based group fused the strongest elements of the British Invasion era — the melodic invention of the Beatles, the whiplash guitars of the Who, and the radiant harmonies of the Byrds — into a ramshackle but poignantly beautiful sound which recaptured the spirit of pop’s past even as it pointed the way toward the music’s future. Although creative tensions, haphazard distribution, and marketplace indifference conspired to ensure Big Star’s brief existence and commercial failure, the group’s three studio albums nevertheless remain unqualified classics, and their impact on subsequent generations of indie bands on both sides of the Atlantic is surpassed only by that of the Velvet Underground.

The roots of Big Star lie in the group Icewater (also known as Rock City), formed in 1971 by singer/guitarist Bell in association with guitarist Steve Ray, bassist Andy Hummel, and drummer Jody Stephens. Ray left the group a short time after its inception and was soon replaced by Chilton, the one-time Box Tops vocalist who was just 16 years old when the group topped the pop charts with their 1967 classic, “The Letter.” Chilton had recently returned to Memphis after attempting to mount a solo career in New York City; he first played with Bell years earlier in a high school cover band, and with his arrival, Icewater rechristened itself Big Star, borrowing the name from a local supermarket chain. Recording soon commenced at the local Ardent Studios, where Bell occasionally worked as an engineer and session guitarist; despite solid critical notice and some radio airplay, their brilliant 1972 debut, #1 Record, nevertheless fell prey to the distribution problems of the newly formed Ardent label’s parent company Stax — more often than not, the album simply never made its way to retailers.

In the meantime, Bell and Chilton continued to butt heads over Big Star’s direction — the former envisioned a primarily studio-oriented project, while the latter preferred performing live; moreover, Chilton’s past success in the Box Tops guaranteed him the lion’s share of attention from listeners and critics, minimizing Bell’s own contributions in the process. In late 1972, Bell finally left the band — his subsequent attempts to mount a solo career proved largely fruitless, with only a spectacular solo single, “I Am the Cosmos,” receiving official release prior to his untimely death in a 1978 car crash. (A posthumous solo compilation, also titled I Am the Cosmos, was finally issued to unanimous critical acclaim in 1992.) Following Bell’s exit, Big Star briefly struggled on as a three-piece before disbanding, with Chilton returning to his stalled solo career; months later, he reteamed with Hummel and Stephens to play a local music writers’ convention, and the performance was so well-received that they decided to make the reunion permanent.

Big Star’s second album, 1974′s Radio City, remains their masterpiece — ragged and raw guitar pop infused with remarkable intensity and spontaneity. It also contained perhaps their best-known song, the oft-covered cult classic “September Gurls.” (Another highlight, “Back of a Car,” bears the unmistakable input of Chris Bell, although the duration and extent of his return to duty is unknown.) Distribution difficulties again undermined whatever hopes of commercial success existed, however, and Hummel soon announced his resignation; Chilton and Stephens recruited bassist John Lightman for a handful of East Coast live dates, including a WLIR radio broadcast later issued as Big Star Live. Work on a planned third album soon began, but the sessions proved disastrous as Chilton, reeling from years of music industry exploitation and frustration, effectively sabotaged his own music — where Radio City teetered on the brink of collapse, the new songs tumbled over completely, culminating in one of the most harrowingly bleak pop records ever made. An album’s worth of material was completed and shelved, and then Big Star was no more.

The story might have ended there, but in 1978, the third Big Star album was finally issued overseas — variously titled Third and/or Sister Lovers, it appeared for years in essentially unauthorized versions containing neither the complete session nor the proper sequencing. Still, the record earned a significant cult following, and with the emergence of the nascent power pop movement, it became increasingly clear just how prescient Big Star’s music had been. Countless alternative rock bands — R.E.M., the Replacements, the dB’s, and Teenage Fanclub, to name just four — cited the band’s enormous influence in the years to follow, and in 1993, the Posies’ Jonathan Auer and Ken Stringfellow backed Chilton and Stephens for a reunion gig at the University of Missouri, a performance captured on the Columbia live disc.

To the surprise of many, the Big Star reunion continued with tours of Europe and Japan, and — most shocking of all — even an appearance on television’s The Tonight Show, although no new studio recordings were forthcoming. Sporadic reunions continued, and a new track (“Hot Thing”) was recorded for a compilation released in 2003. Chilton, Stephens, Stringfellow, and Auer then entered the recording studio to complete a new Big Star album, In Space, released in 2005. The band also played high-profile gigs in England and America, while in 2009, Rhino issued a definitive box set, Keep an Eye on the Sky. One year later, however, on the eve of 2010′s SXSW festival, Chilton died in New Orleans of heart failure.

1. #1 Record [2009 Remaster] (1972)
2. Radio City [2009 Remaster] (1974)
3. Third/Sister Lovers [1992 Rykodisc Version] (1978)
4. Live (1992)
5. #1 Record/Radio City [2004 SACD Remaster] (1992)
6. In Space (2005)
7. Keep an Eye on the Sky [4xCD Box] (2009)

Album artwork is also included. Enjoy!!!!

23Sep/14Off

Nick Drake – Remastered Discography (1969-2004) [FLAC]

Nick Drake – Remastered Discography (1969-2004) [FLAC]
flac – lossless | 837 MB | Folk, Rock

A singular talent who passed almost unnoticed during his brief lifetime, Nick Drake produced several albums of chilling, somber beauty. With hindsight, these have come to be recognized as peak achievements of both the British folk-rock scene and the entire rock singer/songwriter genre. Sometimes compared to Van Morrison, Drake in fact resembled Donovan much more in his breathy vocals, strong melodies, and the acoustic-based orchestral sweep of his arrangements. His was a much darker vision than Donovan’s, however, with disturbing themes of melancholy, failed romance, mortality, and depression lurking just beneath, or even well above, the surface. Ironically, Drake has achieved a far greater stature in the decades following his death, with an avid cult following that grows by the year.

Part of Drake’s failure to attract a mass audience was attributable to his almost pathological reluctance to perform live. It was at a live show in Cambridge, however, that a member of Fairport Convention saw Drake perform, and recommended the singer to producer Joe Boyd. Boyd, already a linchpin of the British folk-rock scene as the producer for Fairport and the Incredible String Band, asked Drake for a tape, and was impressed enough to give the 20-year-old a contract in 1968.

Drake’s debut, Five Leaves Left (1969), was the first in a series of three equally impressive, and quite disparate, albums. With understated folk-rock backing (Pentangle bassist Danny Thompson plays bass on most of the cuts), Drake created a vaguely mysterious, haunting atmosphere, occasionally embellished by tasteful Baroque strings. His economic, even pithy, lyrics hinted at melancholy, yet any thoughts of despair were alleviated by the gorgeous, uplifting melodies and Drake’s calm, measured vocals. Bryter Later (1970) was perhaps his most upbeat effort, featuring support from members of Fairport Convention, and traces of jazz in the arrangements. On some cuts, the singer/songwriter, remarkably, dispensed with lyrics altogether, offering only gorgeous, orchestrated instrumental miniatures that stood well on their own.

Neither album sold well, and Drake, already a brooding loner, plunged into serious depression that often found him unable to make music, work, or even walk and talk. He managed to produce one final full-length work, Pink Moon (1972), a desolate solo acoustic album that ranks as one of the most naked and bleak statements in all of rock. He did record a few more songs before his death, but no more albums were completed, although the final sessions (along with some other fine unreleased material) surfaced on the posthumous compilation Time of No Reply.

Drake’s final couple of years were marked by increasing psychiatric difficulties, which found him hospitalized at one point for several weeks. He had rarely played live during his days as a recording artist, and at one point declared his intention never to record again, although he wished to continue to write songs for others. (It’s been reported that French chanteuse Françoise Hardy recorded some of Drake’s songs, but she hasn’t released any.) On November 26, 1974, he died in his parents’ home from an overdose of antidepressant medication; suicide has been speculated, although some of his family and friends dispute this.

In the manner of the young Romantic poets of the 19th century who died before their time, Drake is revered by many listeners today, with a following that spans generations. Baby boomers who missed him the first time around found much to revisit once they discovered him, and his pensive loneliness speaks directly to contemporary alternative rockers who share his sense of morose alienation.

Contents:

Five Leaves Left [1969] (2000 Remaster)
Bryter Later [1970] (2000 Remaster)
Pink Moon [1972] (2000 Remaster)
Made to Love Magic [2004]

All of the album artwork is included as well enjoy!

23Sep/14Off

Nirvana – Discography (1989-2011) [FLAC]

Nirvana – Discography (1989-2011) [FLAC]
flac – lossless | 10.24 GB | Grunge

Prior to Nirvana, alternative music was consigned to specialty sections of record stores, and major labels considered it to be, at the very most, a tax write-off. After the band’s second album, 1991′s Nevermind, nothing was ever quite the same, for better and for worse. Nirvana popularized punk, post-punk, and indie rock, unintentionally bringing them into the American mainstream like no other band to date. While their sound was equal parts Black Sabbath (as learned by fellow Washington underground rockers the Melvins) and Cheap Trick, Nirvana’s aesthetics were strictly indie rock. They covered Vaselines songs, they revived new wave cuts by Devo, and leader Kurt Cobain relentlessly pushed his favorite bands — whether it was the art punk of the Raincoats or the country-fried hardcore of the Meat Puppets — as if his favorite records were always more important than his own music.

While Nirvana’s ideology was indie rock and their melodies were pop, the sonic rush of their records and live shows merged post-industrial white noise with heavy metal grind. And that’s what made the group an unprecedented multi-platinum sensation. Jane’s Addiction and Soundgarden may have proven to the vast American heavy metal audience that alternative could rock, and the Pixies may have merged pop sensibilities with indie rock white noise, but Nirvana pulled at all together, creating a sound that was both fiery and melodic. Since Nirvana were rooted in the indie aesthetic but loved pop music, they fought their stardom while courting it, becoming some of the most notorious anti-rock stars in history. The result was a conscious attempt to shed their audience with the abrasive In Utero, which only partially fulfilled the band’s goal. But by that point, the fate of the band and Kurt Cobain had been sealed. Suffering from drug addiction and manic depression, Cobain had become destructive and suicidal, though his management and label were able to hide the extent of his problems from the public until April 8, 1994, when he was found dead of a self-inflicted shotgun wound. Cobain may not have been able to weather Nirvana’s success, but the band’s legacy stands as one of the most influential in rock & roll history.

Kurt Cobain (vocals, guitar) met Chris Novoselic (born Krist Novoselic) (bass) in 1985 in Aberdeen, Washington, a small logging town 100 miles away from Seattle. While Novoselic came from a relatively stable background, Cobain’s childhood had been thrown into turmoil when his parents divorced when he was eight. Following the divorce, he lived at the homes of various relatives, developing a love for the Beatles and then heavy metal in the process. Eventually, American hardcore punk worked its way into dominating his listening habits and he met the Melvins, an Olympia-based underground heavy punk band. Cobain began playing in punk bands like Fecal Matter, often with the Melvins’ bassist, Dale Crover. Through the Melvins’ leader, Buzz Osborne, Cobain met Novoselic, who also had an intense interest in punk, which meant that he, like Cobain, felt alienated from the macho, redneck population of Aberdeen. The duo decided to form a band called the Stiff Woodies, with Cobain on drums, Novoselic on bass, and a rotating cast of guitarists and vocalists. The group went through name changes as quickly as guitarists, before deciding that Cobain would play guitar and sing. Renamed Skid Row, the new trio featured drummer Aaron Burkhart, who left the band by the end of 1986 and was replaced by Chad Channing. By 1987, the band was called Nirvana.

Nirvana began playing parties in Olympia, gaining a cult following. During 1987, the band made ten demos with producer Jack Endino, who played the recordings to Jonathan Poneman, one of the founders of the Seattle-based indie label Sub Pop. Poneman signed Nirvana, and in December of 1988, the band released its first single, a cover of Shocking Blue’s “Love Buzz.” Sub Pop orchestrated an effective marketing scheme, which painted the band as backwoods, logging-town hicks, which irritated Cobain and Novoselic. While “Love Buzz” was fairly well-received, the band’s debut album, Bleach, was what got the ball rolling. Recorded for just over $600 and released in the spring of 1989, Bleach slowly became a hit on college radio, due to the group’s consistent touring. Though Jason Everman was credited as a second guitarist on the sleeve of Bleach, he didn’t appear on the record; he only toured in support of the album before leaving the band at the end of the year to join Soundgarden and then Mindfunk. Bleach sold 35,000 copies and Nirvana became favorites of college radio, the British weekly music press, and Sonic Youth, Mudhoney, and Dinosaur Jr., which was enough to attract the attention of major labels.

During the summer of 1990, Nirvana released “Sliver”/”Dive,” which was recorded with Mudhoney’s Dan Peters on drums and produced by Butch Vig. The band also made a six-song demo with Vig, which was shopped to major labels, who soon began competing to sign the group. In August, they hit the road with Sonic Youth’s Goo tour (including Crover on drums). By the end of the summer, Dave Grohl, formerly of the D.C.-based hardcore band Scream, had become Nirvana’s drummer and the band signed with DGC for $287,000. Nirvana recorded their second album with Vig, completing the record in June of 1991. Nevermind was released in September, supported by a quick American tour. While DGC was expecting a moderately successful release, in the neighborhood of 100,000 copies, Nevermind immediately became a smash hit, quickly selling out its initial shipment of 50,000 copies and creating a shortage across America. What helped the record become a success was “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” a blistering four-chord rocker that was accompanied by a video that shot into heavy MTV rotation. By the beginning of 1992, “Smells Like Teen Spirit” had climbed into the American Top Ten and Nevermind bumped Michael Jackson’s much-touted comeback album Dangerous off the top of the album charts; it reached the British Top Ten shortly afterward. By February, the album had been certified triple platinum.

Nirvana’s success took the music industry by surprise, Nirvana included. It soon become apparent that the band wasn’t quite sure how to handle its success. Around the time of Nevermind’s release, the band was into baiting its audience — Cobain appeared on MTV’s Headbangers Ball in drag, the group mocked the tradition of miming on the BBC’s Top of the Pops by Novoselic constantly throwing his bass into the air and Cobain singing his live vocals in the style of Ian Curtis, and their traditional live destruction of instruments was immortalized on a Saturday Night Live performance that ended with Novoselic and Grohl sharing a kiss — but by the spring, questions had begun to arise about the band’s stability. Cobain married Courtney Love, the leader of the indie rock/foxcore band Hole, in February of 1992, announcing that the couple was expecting a child in the fall. Shortly after the marriage, rumors that Cobain and Love were heavy heroin users began to circulate and the strength of the rumors only increased when Nirvana canceled several summer concerts and refused to mount a full-scale American tour during the summer. Cobain complained that he was suffering from chronic stomach troubles, which seemed to be confirmed when he was admitted to a Belfast hospital after a June concert. But heroin rumors continued to surface, especially in the form of a late-summer Vanity Fair article implying that Love was using during her pregnancy. Both Love and Cobain denied the article’s allegations, and publicly harassed and threatened the article’s author. Love delivered Frances Bean Cobain, a healthy baby girl, on August 18, 1992, but the couple soon battled with Los Angeles’ children’s services, who claimed they were unfit parents on the basis of the Vanity Fair article. The couple was granted custody of the child by the beginning of 1993.

Since Cobain was going through such well-documented personal problems, Nirvana were unable to record a follow-up to Nevermind until the spring of 1993. In the meantime, DGC released the odds-and-ends compilation Incesticide late in 1992; the album reached number 39 in the U.S. and number 14 U.K. As Nirvana prepared to make their third album, they released “Oh, the Guilt” as a split single with the Jesus Lizard on Touch & Go Records. Choosing Steve Albini (Pixies, the Breeders, Big Black, the Jesus Lizard) as their producer, they recorded their third album, In Utero, in two weeks during the spring of 1993. Following its completion, controversy began to surround Nirvana again. Cobain suffered a heroin overdose on May 2, but the event was hidden from the press. The following month, Love called police to their Seattle home after Cobain locked himself in the bathroom, threatening suicide. Prior to debuting In Utero material during the New Music Seminar at New York’s Roseland Ballroom in July, Cobain had another covered-up overdose. By that time, reports began to circulate, including an article in Newsweek, that DGC was unhappy with the forthcoming album, and making accusations that the band deliberately made an uncommercial record. Both the band and the label denied such allegations. Deciding that Albini’s production was too flat, Nirvana decided to remaster the album with R.E.M.’s producer, Scott Litt.

In Utero was released in September of 1993 to positive reviews and strong initial sales, debuting at the top of the U.S. and U.K. charts. Nirvana supported it with a fall American tour, hiring former Germs member Pat Smear as an auxiliary guitarist. While the album and the tour were both successful, sales weren’t quite as strong as expected, with several shows not selling out until the week of the concert. As a result, the group agreed to play MTV’s acoustic Unplugged show at the end of the year, and sales of In Utero picked up after its December airing. After wrapping up the U.S. tour on January 8, 1994, with a show at Center Arena in Seattle, Nirvana embarked on a European tour in February. Following a concert in Munich on February 29, Cobain stayed in Rome to vacation with Love. On March 4, she awakened to find that Cobain had attempted suicide by overdosing on the tranquilizer Rohypnol and drinking champagne. While the attempt was initially reported as an accidental overdose, it was known within the Nirvana camp that the vocalist had left behind a suicide note.

Cobain returned to Seattle within a week of his hospitalization and his mental illness began to grow. On March 18, the police had to again talk the singer out of suicide after he locked himself in a room threatening to kill himself. Love and Nirvana’s management organized an intervention program that resulted in Cobain’s admission to the Exodus Recovery Center in L.A. on March 30, but he escaped from the clinic on April 1, returning to Seattle. His mother filed a missing persons report on April 4. The following day, Cobain shot himself in the head at his Seattle home. His body wasn’t discovered until April 8, when an electrician contracted to install an alarm system at the Cobain house stumbled upon the body. After his death, Kurt Cobain was quickly anointed as a spokesman for Generation X, as well as a symbol of its tortured angst.

Novoselic and Grohl planned to release a double-disc live album at the end of 1994, but sorting through the tapes proved to be too painful, so MTV Unplugged in New York appeared in its place. The album debuted at the top of the British and American charts, as a home video comprised of live performances and interviews from the band’s Nevermind era, titled Live! Tonight! Sold Out!, was issued at the same time (the project began prior to Cobain’s passing and was completed by surviving bandmembers). In 1996, MTV Unplugged in New York’s electric counterpart, From the Muddy Banks of the Wishkah, was released, debuting at the top of the U.S. charts. Following Cobain’s death, Grohl formed the Foo Fighters (early rumors that Novoselic would also be a member of the band ultimately proved to be false), releasing their self-titled debut album in 1995, followed by The Colour and the Shape in 1997 and There Is Nothing Left to Lose in 1999. Novoselic formed the trio Sweet 75, releasing their debut in the spring of 1997, and also appeared along with former Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra and former Soundgarden guitarist Kim Thayil on the 2000 live set Live From the Battle in Seattle under the name the No W.T.O. Combo.

By the late ’90s, research began by Novoselic for a proposed box set of previously unreleased songs from throughout Nirvana’s career. The project was supposed to surface in the fall of 2001 (to coincide with the tenth anniversary release of Nevermind), but legal problems began to surface. In 1997, Grohl and Novoselic formed the Nirvana L.L.C. partnership with Courtney Love (who manages Cobain’s estate); Nirvana L.L.C. required a unanimous vote by all three regarding future albums, photos, and anything else Nirvana-related. When the three couldn’t agree on the songs to be included in the box set, the matter was taken to court as Love attempted to dissolve the partnership. The project was ultimately shelved indefinitely as any legal decision was tied up in court.

1. Bleach (1989)
2. Nevermind (1991)
3. Incesticide (1992)
4. In Utero (1993)
5. MTV Unplugged in New York (1994)
6. From the Muddy Banks of the Wishkah (1996)
7. Nirvana [Best Of] (2002)
8. With the Lights Out [3xCD + DVD] (2004)
9. Sliver: The Best of the Box (2005)
10. Live at Reading (2009)
11. Bleach [20th Anniversary Deluxe Edition] (2009)
12. Nevermind [20th Anniversary Deluxe Edition] (2011)

Album artwork is also included. Enjoy!!!

23Sep/14Off

Portishead – Discography (1994-2008) [FLAC]

Portishead – Discography (1994-2008) [FLAC]
flac – lossless | 5.8 GB | Trip-Hop

Portishead may not have invented trip-hop, but they were among the first to popularize it, particularly in America. Taking their cue from the slow, elastic beats that dominated Massive Attack’s Blue Lines and adding elements of cool jazz, acid house, and soundtrack music, Portishead created an atmospheric, alluringly dark sound. The group wasn’t as avant-garde as Tricky, nor as tied to dance traditions as Massive Attack; instead, it wrote evocative pseudo-cabaret pop songs that subverted their conventional structures with experimental productions and rhythms of trip-hop. As a result, Portishead appealed to a broad audience — not just electronic dance and alternative rock fans, but thirtysomethings who found techno, trip-hop, and dance as exotic as worldbeat. Before Portishead released their debut album, Dummy, in 1994, trip-hop’s broad appeal wasn’t apparent, but the record became an unexpected success in Britain, topping most year-end critics polls and earning the prestigious Mercury Music Prize; in America, it also became an underground hit, selling over 150,000 copies before the group toured the U.S. Following the success of Dummy, legions of imitators appeared over the next two years, but Portishead remained quiet as they worked on their second album.

Named after the West Coast shipping town where Geoff Barrow grew up, Portishead formed in Bristol, England, in 1991. Prior to the group’s formation, Barrow had worked as a tape operator at the Coach House studio, where he met Massive Attack. Through that group, he began working with Tricky, producing the rapper’s track for a Sickle Cell charity album. Barrow also wrote songs for Neneh Cherry’s Homebrew, though only “Somedays” appeared on the record. Around the time of Portishead’s formation, he had begun to earn a reputation as a remix producer, working on tracks by Primal Scream, Paul Weller, Gabrielle, and Depeche Mode. Barrow met Beth Gibbons, who had been singing in pubs, in 1991 on a job scheme. Over the next few years, the pair began writing music, often with jazz guitarist Adrian Utley, who had previously played with both Big John Patton and the Jazz Messengers.

Before releasing a recording, Portishead completed the short film To Kill a Dead Man, an homage to ’60s spy movies. Barrow and Gibbons acted in the noirish film and provided the soundtrack, which earned the attention of Go! Records. By the fall, Portishead had signed with Go! and their debut album, Dummy, was released shortly afterward. Dummy was recorded with engineer Dave MacDonald, who played drums and drum machines, and guitarist Utley, who rounded out Portishead’s lineup.
Both Barrow and Gibbons were media-shy — the vocalist refused to participate in any interviews — which meant that the album received little attention outside of the weekly U.K. music press, which praised the album and its two singles, “Numb” and “Sour Times,” heavily. Soon, Go! and Portishead had developed a clever marketing strategy based on the group’s atmospheric videos that began to attract attention. Melody Maker, Mixmag, and The Face named Dummy as 1994′s album of the year, and early in 1995, “Glory Box” debuted at number 13 without any radio play. Around the same time, “Sour Times” entered regular rotation on MTV in America. Within a few weeks, Dummy and “Sour Times” were alternative rock hits in the U.S. Back in the U.K., the album had crossed over into the mainstream, becoming a fixture in the British Top 40. In July, the record won the Mercury Music Prize for Album of the Year, beating highly touted competition from Blur, Suede, Oasis, and Pulp.

Following the Mercury Music Prize award, Barrow retreated to Coach House to begin work on Portishead’s second album. The self-titled record finally appeared in September 1997. The live PNYC followed late the next year. The self-titled record finally appeared in September 1997. Portishead went on hiatus starting in 1999, and Barrow, Utley and Gibbons worked on their own projects. In 2001, Barrow formed Invada Records, an experimental label that included Koolism on its roster. Barrow and Utley also recorded a cover of the instrumental rock classic “Apache” as the Jimi Entley Sound that was released as a limited edition 7″ single in 2002. The pair also worked as producers, with Barrow working under the moniker Fuzzface on Stephanie McKay’s McKay album in 2003, and Barrow and Utley co-produced the Coral’s 2005 album The Invisible Invasion. Gibbons collaborated with Rustin’ Man, a.k.a. former Talk Talk member Paul Webb on the 2003 album Out of Season (Gibbons had also appeared on a few tracks by Webb’s previous project, ORang).

Portishead reconvened in 2005, performing their first live dates in seven years, including an appearance at the Tsunami Benefit Concert in Bristol, and recording material for their next album. Their version of “Un Jour Comme un Autre (Requiem for Anna)” appeared on 2006′s Serge Gainsbourg tribute Monsieur Gainsbourg Revisted, and in 2007 the band curated the Nightmare Before Christmas All Tomorrow’s Parties festival. In 2008, a decade after their last album, Portishead returned with Third, the trio’s most challenging, unpredictable work yet.

Dummy (1994)
Glory Times (1995)
Portishead (1997)
Roseland Live NYC (1998)
Third (2008)

Extra: Roseland Live NYC [DVD] (2001)

All of the album artwork is also included. Enjoy!!!

19Sep/14Off

Joy Division – Official Discography (1979-2011) [FLAC]

Joy Division – Official Discography (1979-2011) [FLAC]
flac – lossless | 8.6 GB | Post-Punk

Formed in the wake of the punk explosion in England, Joy Division became the first band in the post-punk movement by later emphasizing not anger and energy but mood and expression, pointing ahead to the rise of melancholy alternative music in the ’80s. Though the group’s raw initial sides fit the bill for any punk band, Joy Division later incorporated synthesizers (taboo in the low-tech world of ’70s punk) and more haunting melodies, emphasized by the isolated, tortured lyrics of its lead vocalist, Ian Curtis. While the British punk movement shocked the world during the late ’70s, Joy Division’s quiet storm of musical restraint and emotive power proved to be just as important to independent music in the 1980s.

The band was founded in early 1977, soon after the Sex Pistols had made their first appearance in Manchester. Guitarist Bernard Albrecht (b. Bernard Dicken, January 4, 1956) and bassist Peter Hook (b. February 13, 1956) had met while at the show and later formed a band called the Stiff Kittens; after placing an ad through a Manchester record store, they added vocalist Ian Curtis (b. July 15, 1956) and drummer Steve Brotherdale. Renamed Warsaw (from David Bowie’s “Warszawa”), the band made its live debut the following May, supporting the Buzzcocks and Penetration at Manchester’s Electric Circus. After the recording of several demos, Brotherdale quit the group in August 1977, prompting the hire of Stephen Morris (b. October 28, 1957). A name change to Joy Division in late 1977 — necessitated by the punk band Warsaw Pakt — was inspired by Karol Cetinsky’s World War II novel The House of Dolls. (In the book, the term “joy division” was used as slang for concentration camp units wherein female inmates were forced to prostitute themselves for the enjoyment of Nazi soldiers.)

Playing frequently in the north country during early 1978, the quartet gained the respect of several influential figures: Rob Gretton, a Manchester club DJ who became the group’s manager; Tony Wilson, a TV/print journalist and owner of the Factory Records label; and Derek Branwood, a record executive with RCA Northwest, who recorded sessions in May 1978, for what was planned to be Joy Division’s self-titled debut LP. Though several songs bounded with punk energy, the rest of the album showed at an early age the band’s later trademarks: Curtis’ themes of post-industrial restlessness and emotional despair, Hook’s droning bass lines, and the jagged guitar riffs of Albrecht.

The album should have been hailed as a punk classic, but when a studio engineer added synthesizers to several tracks — believing that the punk movement had to move on and embrace new sounds — Joy Division scrapped the entire LP. (Titled Warsaw for a 1982 bootleg, the album was finally given wide issue ten years later.) The first actual Joy Division release came in June 1978, when the initial mid-1977 demos were released as the EP An Ideal for Living, on the band’s own Enigma label. Early in 1979, the buzz surrounding Joy Division increased with a session recorded for John Peel’s BBC radio show.

The group began recording with producer Martin Hannett and released Unknown Pleasures on old friend Tony Wilson’s Factory label in July 1979. The album enjoyed immense critical acclaim and a long stay on the U.K.’s independent charts. Encouraged by the punk buzz, the American Warner Bros. label offered a large distribution contract that fall. The band ignored it but did record another radio session for John Peel on November 26th. (Both sessions were later collected on the Peel Sessions album.)

During late 1979, Joy Division’s manic live show gained many converts, partly due to rumors of Curtis’ ill health. An epilepsy sufferer, he was prone to breakdowns and seizures while on stage — it soon grew difficult to distinguish the fits from his usual on-stage jerkiness and manic behavior. As the live dates continued and the new decade approached, Curtis grew weaker and more prone to seizures. After a short rest over the Christmas holiday, Joy Division embarked on a European tour during January, though several dates were cancelled because of Curtis. The group began recording its second LP after the tour ended (again with Hannett), and released “Love Will Tear Us Apart” in April. The single was again praised but failed to move beyond the independent charts. After one gig in early May, the members of Joy Division were given two weeks of rest before beginning the group’s first U.S. tour. Two days before the scheduled flight, however, Curtis was found dead in his home, the victim of a self-inflicted hanging.

Before Curtis’ death, the band had agreed that Joy Division would cease to exist if any member left, for any reason. Ironically though, the summer of 1980 proved to be the blooming of the band’s commercial status, when a re-release of “Love Will Tear Us Apart” rose to number 13 on the British singles chart. In August, the release of Closer finally united critics’ positivity with glowing sales, as the album peaked at number six. Before the end of the summer, Unknown Pleasures was charting as well.

By January of the following year, Hook, Morris, and Albrecht (now Bernard Sumner) had formed New Order, with Sumner taking over vocal duties. Also in 1981, the posthumous release of Still — including two sides of rare tracks and two of live songs — rose to number five on the British charts. As New Order’s star began to shine during the ’80s, the group had trouble escaping the long shadow of Curtis and Joy Division. “Love Will Tear Us Apart” charted for the third time in 1983, and 1988 also proved a big year for the defunct band: the reissued single “Atmosphere” hit number 34 and a double-album compilation entitled Substance reached number seven in the album charts. Seven years later, the 15th anniversary of Curtis’ death was memorialized with a new JD compilation (Permanent: Joy Division 1995), a tribute album (A Means to an End), and a biography of his life (Touching From a Distance) written by his widow, Deborah Curtis. In 1999, the Factory label began a program of concert-performance reissues — all overseen by the remainder of the original lineup — with Preston Warehouse 28 February 1980.

1979 – Unknown Pleasures
1980 – Closer
1981 – Still
1988 – Substance
1995 – Permanent
1997 – Heart and Soul (4-CD Box)
1999 – Preston 28 February 1980
2000 – The Complete BBC Recordings
2001 – Les Bains Douches 18 December 1979
2007 – Unknown Pleasures [Collector's Edition] (2-CD)
2007 – Closer [Collector's Edition] (2-CD)
2007 – Still [Collector's Edition] (2-CD)
2008 – The Best of Joy Division
2010 – +- Singles 1978-1980 (10-CD Box)
2011 – Total: From Joy Division to New Order

Each album is guaranteed CDDA. Album artwork is also included. Enjoy!!!!!

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